FIRST CERTIFIED ARBOR CARE

Palm Trees--List of Potential Palm takers and Donors/ Sellers
First, a word about selling or giving away your palm tree. There are many species of palms grown in the Inland Empire. Their value to a landscaper depends upon one primary factor: their ability to sell the palm tree and make a profit.

The best time to transplant palms is at the beginning of the warm season. Durable palms, like California and Mexican fan palms, can be transplanted almost any time.

See pruning recommendations at the end of this list.


A.   Common palms not usually wanted
•  Mexican fan palm, Mexican/California hybrid fan palm
•  queen palm (see palm taker list)
•  palms that are taller )(including the height of the leaves) than a normal flatbed trailer (53').

B.  Common palms that can usually be given away if they are the right size, accessible, in good condition, AND you have time to wait:
•  California fan palm
•  Canary Island date
•  dactylifera (fruiting) date palm

C.  Common palms that can usually be given away or maybe even sold:
•  fortune palm
•  Mediterranean fan palm (nice clumps are quite valuable)

D.   Less-common palms that can almost always be given away or sold:
•  Mexican blue palm
•  Guadalupe palm
•  Senegal date palm (large, nice clumps are valuable)
•  pygmy date palm

E.  Rare palms that can or should be preserved even if you can't sell them:
•  pindo palm
•  lady palm, Raphis
•  cliff date palm, Phoenix rupicola
•  Chinese fountain palm, or any Livistona palm
•  Phoenix sylvestris, silver leaf date palm
•  Chamaedorea, parlor or bamboo palms
•  tropical palms such as majesty, triangle, needle palms

F.  Palm-like plants worth transplanting and preserving
•  Sago palm, Cycas revoluta
•  Any other cycad
•  Dracena palm, Cordyline
•  Pony tail palm, Beaucarnia recurvata
•  dragon tree, Dracena draco


DEAD LEAVES SHOULD BE REMOVED BECAUSE OF THE EXTREME FIRE DANGER. BURNING PALM LEAVES BLOW IN THE WIND AND SPREAD FIRE RAPIDLY.

Pruning recommendations:

Remove all dead leaves and flower/seed stalks. The portion of green leaves that can be removed varies. Many palms are overpruned. Mexican fan palm, and other fast growing palms tolerate overpruning while they are young and vigorous. Current industry specifications allow removal of leaves below the 10 o'clock and 2 o'clock angles.

California fan palms should not have as many leaves removed. Date palms: remove only enough green leaves to get the clearance from buildings and for traffic.

Slow growing palms like Mexican blue and guadalupe palms should only have the dead leaves removed.

Leaves are the tree's income. Trunk, flowers, fruit, roots are the tree's energy sinks--or expenses. Massive palms, like Canary Island date, and California fan palm, have to spend lots of energy just maintaining all of their mass. They need all of the green leaves they produce to suport this mass. Removing green leaves takes away their energy income, so they draw on stored starches (savings). Continued or severe overpruning depletes starch reserves, stunts the tree, makes it susceptible to disease, may cause narrow spots in the trunk, or may even kill the tree.

Sometimes, pruning green leaves causes or worsens nutrient deficiency symptoms in palms. Soluble nutrient elements are withdrawn from old leaves as they die, so minor elements are recycled within the tree. Deficiency symptoms can be treated by applying special palm fertilizer, but it is better to let the leaves dry on the tree before removal.

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